Regulator reamers???

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dirk the piper
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Regulator reamers???

Post by dirk the piper » Wed Apr 06, 2005 12:24 am

So, is anyone here interested in making pipes? If so, I'm looking for people who would go in with me on ordering reamers suitable for making D-set regulators. This taper would also be good for some C chanter designs. Tim Britton would then order the reamers. These reamers have a straight taper, are very high quality, and reverse-spiral fluted. The more people who order, the cheaper the reamers are to make. Please let me know either by PM or post if you are interested.

-Dirk
I'm a piper, you're a piper, he's a piper, she's a piper - wouldn't you like to be a piper too?

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PJ
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Post by PJ » Wed Apr 06, 2005 7:42 am

I've no illusions about my skill as an instrument maker (ha!!), but I've great respect for those who spent years learning the craft and perfecting their skill. I'm delighted they do so, so that I can enjoy the product of their labour.

Good luck with this endeavour. It's not for the faint of heart!!
PJ

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dirk the piper
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Post by dirk the piper » Wed Apr 06, 2005 9:02 am

Thanks, PJ, for the encouragement. When I told Kirk Lynch I was doing this, he told me, "You really are crazy!" I'd have to agree. ;-)

So, how many people have signed up here now? Any real pipe-makers out there?

-Dirk
I'm a piper, you're a piper, he's a piper, she's a piper - wouldn't you like to be a piper too?

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Post by Bill » Wed Apr 06, 2005 9:14 am

"So, how many people have signed up here now? Any real pipe-makers out there?

-Dirk"

52 and counting the last I looked. Pat Sky has come on board, I see.
Bill

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Post by PJ » Wed Apr 06, 2005 9:35 am

David Boisvert has also signed on.
PJ

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Post by Guest » Wed Apr 06, 2005 9:37 am

I have always wanted to get into pipemaking... in fact, back in the early 80's, I copied the Garvin book from the local library with the intent of making a chanter and drones because I couldn't get my hands on a set, there just wasn't a vast internet resource at that time. However, not having the required tools to make a set, I settled for GHBs... and in some small way, I think it was the better choice at the time.

I'm still toying with the idea of making a set, but time (and more importantly) money to fund such an effort, has me putting it off until I am independantly wealthy... like THAT'S ever going to happen... :mrgreen:

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Post by Bill » Wed Apr 06, 2005 9:48 am

PJ wrote:David Boisvert has also signed on.

Oops! What a silly oversight on my part. Anyway, no pipemaker need worry about my entering the pipemaking fray. I'm perfectly happy just playing the tunes and learning how to keep my pipes in good working order.
Bill

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dirk the piper
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Post by dirk the piper » Wed Apr 06, 2005 3:29 pm

I really hope no pipe-makers out there are worrying about more pipe-makers starting up for competitive reasons. I think there are other reasons they may worry, or roll their eyes.
So far, the main thing I have heard is that I better learn to make reeds first. I have also been told by more than one well-respected maker and player that I better make good pipes, or forget it. There are enough bad chanters out there already.

-Dirk
I'm a piper, you're a piper, he's a piper, she's a piper - wouldn't you like to be a piper too?

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Post by the plod » Thu Apr 07, 2005 12:03 pm

Hi Dirk, I have split this thread to the reed and pipemakers forum if you don't mind to kind of jumpstart things over there.

Jeff

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John Mulhern
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Post by John Mulhern » Thu Apr 07, 2005 5:20 pm

Dirk, if you have a metal lathe and basic measuring instrument's (travel indicator, mic or dial caliper's), have you considered making your own reamer? I've had good success doing it in small segment's...but it's very time consuming. The advantage is the only cost is your time, and the tool steel... and you have the freedom to cheaply experiment with any profile you choose. The problem is, cutting a helix is difficult...rotation in a 4th axis must be tied into longitudinal feed...requiring either a manual mill with a dividing head tied into it's X axis, or CNC access. Also, you are kinda limited to O-1 or A-2 in a home built reamer...HSS is just too tough to be machined & must be ground on a tool & cutter grinder. If you're willing to settle for a 3/4 segment reamer, and have access to a mill, too...you could make what you're seeking inexpensively, yourself.
I remember seeing two of Tim's reamer's on Ebay...absolutely beautiful. I think the first one mentioned Gammons Hoaglund, a precision tool manufacturer in Conn., and apparently a dependable name in helical fluted reamer's.

http://www.gammons.com/

http://www.practicalmachinist.com/cgi-b ... 010643;p=0

ps: Cool avatar! That thing look's like it could turn telephone pole's! :mrgreen:

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dirk the piper
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Post by dirk the piper » Sun Apr 10, 2005 10:57 pm

Hi John,

Unfortunately, I don't have a metal lathe yet, just a wood lathe. Maybe someday I'll get into making my own reamer, but I'd like to build a couple sets first.

All the Best,

-Dirk
I'm a piper, you're a piper, he's a piper, she's a piper - wouldn't you like to be a piper too?

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dirk the piper
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Post by dirk the piper » Sun Apr 10, 2005 11:13 pm

I r
emember seeing two of Tim's reamer's on Ebay...absolutely beautiful. I think the first one mentioned Gammons Hoaglund, a precision tool manufacturer in Conn., and apparently a dependable name in helical fluted reamer's.

http://www.gammons.com/

http://www.practicalmachinist.com/cgi-b ... 010643;p=0

ps: Cool avatar! That thing look's like it could turn telephone pole's! Mr. Green
Thanks for the links! Those are both great sites, and I'm looking forward to perusing them in the morning... I made the Avitar from a photo on the
Vicmarc website... http://www.vicmarc.com/ I wish I had a lathe like that - I could make a really flat chanter...

:-)

-Dirk
I'm a piper, you're a piper, he's a piper, she's a piper - wouldn't you like to be a piper too?

texasbagpiper
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Post by texasbagpiper » Tue Aug 30, 2005 10:55 am

dirk the piper wrote:I r
emember seeing two of Tim's reamer's on Ebay...absolutely beautiful. I think the first one mentioned Gammons Hoaglund, a precision tool manufacturer in Conn., and apparently a dependable name in helical fluted reamer's.

http://www.gammons.com/

http://www.practicalmachinist.com/cgi-b ... 010643;p=0

ps: Cool avatar! That thing look's like it could turn telephone pole's! Mr. Green
Thanks for the links! Those are both great sites, and I'm looking forward to perusing them in the morning... I made the Avitar from a photo on the
Vicmarc website... http://www.vicmarc.com/ I wish I had a lathe like that - I could make a really flat chanter...

:-)

-Dirk

Here's mine

Image

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Post by billh » Tue Aug 30, 2005 12:29 pm

John Mulhern wrote:Dirk, if you have a metal lathe and basic measuring instrument's (travel indicator, mic or dial caliper's), have you considered making your own reamer? I've had good success doing it in small segment's...but it's very time consuming. The advantage is the only cost is your time, and the tool steel... and you have the freedom to cheaply experiment with any profile you choose. ...
The helical shape is not necessary; D reamers are the tool of choice of some of our finest makers. It's worth making your own at least to 'refine' your design, why pay for an expensive reamer only to find that you wish it had a different taper, or a slightly different profile? (I am a believer in non-straight reamers). I figure a big D reamer takes me about a day from start to finish. Making a number of shorter reamers has the advantage that you have more flexibility in the final bore you make with them (especially if they are "convex" as opposed to perfectly straight), and if you screw up while machining one, you don't have to throw the whole length away.

Bill

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Post by Jonathan_P » Tue Aug 30, 2005 7:38 pm

billh wrote:I figure a big D reamer takes me about a day from start to finish.
Can you expand a bit on your reamer-making technique? Having read everything I can find about this, I'm inclined to agree that the D-reamer is the way to go, in terms of ease of manufacture, minimal friction, and reshapenability with a slipstone and burnisher. I'm about to begin making some for myself, so I'm interested in any insights you can offer.
Making a number of shorter reamers has the advantage that you have more flexibility in the final bore you make with them (especially if they are "convex" as opposed to perfectly straight), and if you screw up while machining one, you don't have to throw the whole length away.
I was thinking the same thing, and planning to use that approach. Once again, a short "partial" reamer is going to have less friction than a long one, and thus be more efficient to use and last longer.

I have just finished setting up an old 9" x 24" metal-working lathe in my shop. I bought a drawbar and collets to fit it, solely for the purpose of reamermaking. I'd like to try turning short straight "stepped" sections of the taper, pull the rod stock out of the collet a fixed distance, and then turn the next step (and so on), and then file away the steps and polish the reamer blank. This seems like a better way to make a non-straight taper on a thin, flexible rod than using a taper-cutting attachment or tailstock setover on the lathe.

I'm wondering in particular about the best way to mill away the other half of the "D" profile. I don't have a milling machine (or room for one, for that matter). I'm thinking of something like a toolpost-mounted grinder or slitting saw, but perhaps there's an easier way.

Do you have any thoughts about what I've suggested here, or ways to make the job easier or the tool better?
Jonathan

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