Cornish Double Pipes

A forum to discuss some of the many other types of bagpipes played worldwide.

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MarkS
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Post by MarkS » Tue Jan 02, 2007 8:17 pm

Yuri wrote:Does Julian make the reeds, or are they some kind of off-the-shelf ones, though I can't imagine what sort of other pipes would use this reed?
Julian makes the reeds for all his instruments. I don't know if the CDP reeds are interchangeable with other pipes, but I doubt it.

Got any pics of the pipes you made that you can share?
Cheers,
Mark

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Yuri
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Post by Yuri » Wed Jan 03, 2007 11:57 pm

Soon.

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Yuri
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Post by Yuri » Sat Jan 06, 2007 9:51 pm

Pictures of my pipes with the double chanter.
You can see on the left-hand chanter that the middle hole has been moved up a bit. That's because of the demands of cross-fingering. You need to really finetune the position/size of the fingerholes if you want the semitones be in tune.
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the plod
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Post by the plod » Sun Jan 07, 2007 10:48 am

Lovely Yuri, how do they sound?

Jeff

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Yuri
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Post by Yuri » Sun Jan 07, 2007 7:50 pm

According to my girlfriend, like a crumhorn consort. The point of the whole exercise of making them is that I can play medieval and Renaissance polyphonic music on them. Maximum 2 parts, though, but with the range available it's quite a lot.

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Post by the plod » Sun Jan 07, 2007 9:13 pm

beautiful carving, did you do that yourself? What kind of reeds does it use?

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Yuri
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Post by Yuri » Mon Jan 08, 2007 1:30 am

Well, I make my living (or what passes for it) from carving mostly, so a bit for myself is not a great deal. (have a look at my site if interested)
The reeds for this particular one are Ordinary Gibson Fireside ones. The pipes themselves are, however, completely redesigned, they are conical, for one thing. To my utter amazement, the reeds still work as well as for the original cilyndrical bores. The sound would be still smallpipe-y, if it weren't for the polyphonic playing. When I use only the bass drone, it's more smallpipe-y, with the baritone it becomes really wild, sort of fitting into a heavy heavy metal kind of sound. Quite a lot of medieval music sounds like that, by the way. It's to do with the heavy use of fifths in the music.
These are not the only pipes I pay, by the way. All the others have single chanters, all having recorder-type cromatic fingering, to play medieval music, again.

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Post by CHasR » Mon Jan 08, 2007 10:50 am

So youre familiar with the pipes of Joel Robinson (? think thats the name ?)
in NYC, +Paul Beekhuizen in NE?
I have the opprotunity of hearing Joan Kimball, Tom Zajac, & Adam Gilbert playing 'in consort' with Piffaro often. "Pan's Fancy' lives a couple of blocks from me. 8)
nice pipes, BTW :D :D

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Yuri
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Post by Yuri » Mon Jan 08, 2007 9:50 pm

Well, no, not really. I just live far too far awy from anywhere. To tell the truth, in the city (20 minutes away), there are 120 000 people. There are also 73 562 pipers. Out of these 73 362 play the GHB ,and 199 the SSP. just my luck that I don't play either, and the music i'm interested in doesn't allow the use of either.
(By the way, the city is called Dunedin. That rather explains it, doesn't it?)
I have heard Piffaro, and also read comments on the fact that they use pipes with recorder fingering, thereby drawing flak from both GHB and SSP players. But the point is, a medieval estampie sounds ridiculous with Scottish embellishments, even supposing the range fits. (which it doesn't)(usually)

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MarkS
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Post by MarkS » Tue Jan 09, 2007 6:59 am

Yuri wrote:Pictures of my pipes with the double chanter.
Nice looking set, Yuri. The carving is a nice touch. What are the woods, and what did you use as a design basis for the chanters? We'd love to hear a sound clip!
Cheers,
Mark

There's never enough time to do all the nothing you want.
~~ Bill Watterson, Calvin and Hobbes

CHasR
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Post by CHasR » Tue Jan 09, 2007 8:29 am

Yuri wrote:Well, no, not really. I just live far too far awy from anywhere. To tell the truth, in the city (20 minutes away), there are 120 000 people. There are also 73 562 pipers. Out of these 73 362 play the GHB ,and 199 the SSP. just my luck that I don't play either, and the music i'm interested in doesn't allow the use of either.
(By the way, the city is called Dunedin. That rather explains it, doesn't it?)
I have heard Piffaro, and also read comments on the fact that they use pipes with recorder fingering, thereby drawing flak from both GHB and SSP players. But the point is, a medieval estampie sounds ridiculous with Scottish embellishments, even supposing the range fits. (which it doesn't)(usually)
What I find interesting is that they play pipes in consort, (which really didnt become widespread until what...1500's? ..early rennaisance...after the bagpipe's decline - correct me if Im wrong)

eliminating the possibility of any extensive ornamentation - 3 part counterpoint with ornaments is a difficult texture to sustain without any masking going on...

Perhaps the vocal equivalent is Anonymous 4- women werent even allowed to read in Mass, let alone sing motets...(apart from Hildegard, of course)

nevertheless, theyre both beautiful sounds, otherwise never have been heard unless authenticity was suspended for the sake of artistic interpretation...just food for thought Yuri... :wink: , outnumbered as you are....

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Yuri
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Post by Yuri » Tue Jan 09, 2007 10:09 pm

Now, while I'm perfectly male in every respect, with a string of girlfriends to prove it, I'm also aware of this misconception about no women singers in medieval times. Just who do you think sang in nunneries? It's highly unlikely to suppose that whenever some singing was to be done, a bunch of monks turned up. They would have loved that, of course, but no luck.
anyway, the woods are boxwood for the yellow bits, and an unidentified very hard, very old, probably Indonesian I'd say something for the red bits. This wood comes from a demolished , roughly 100 year-old jetty not far from where i am. Got a whole load for a song. The wood is increadibly stable. And, of course, rather dry.
Now to bagpipe's decline, consorts and suchlike. As far as I'm aware the decline of pipes is a very different story from place to place. In Hungary, where I came from, it became very fashionable in court circles in the 17-18th centuries. (Not royal court, that was in Vienna, but the local nobility courts) It coincided with a resurgence of nationalistic feelings. Out of other countries I hardly need to point out Scotland, where it's debatable if the bagpipe was present before the 14th century at all. I'm just passing on other's opinions, it's not my own.
As far as "high art" goes, it is probably safe to assume that the bp declined in favour in most European countries by the 17th century, but town bands, paid by the council still had pipers on roll as a matter of course throughout the 16th and maybe first half of 17th c. As to folk music, well it never really fell from favour there in nearly all countries where it existed in the first place.
And as to consotrts. I'd think (never myself performed in such setting) that the sensible idea is to leave ornamentation, at least improvised one, to the highest (or main) voice, and for the other parts play just the score as it stands. Some modern french playing on those lines works very well.

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