18th Century Lowland Pipes discovered..

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upiper71
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Post by upiper71 » Tue Jan 23, 2007 4:05 pm

[quote="Yuri"]I'd like to add that from the look of the photos the drones appear to be made of some timber not commonly used in woodwind making. It's of course very difficult to tell from photos, but my guess would be either mulberry (the much lighter spot on the stock is very tipycal of it) or chesnut.[/quote]

I should add, if any one pipemaker out there could be of service in possibly identifying the type of wood(by pictoral guessing), that would a great service to do more research of this particular set, by all means..post a comment or two. Much appreciated! :)

All the best,

D

Channing
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Location: Portland, OR

Post by Channing » Sun Aug 12, 2007 4:49 am

Yuri wrote:I'd like to add that from the look of the photos the drones appear to be made of some timber not commonly used in woodwind making. It's of course very difficult to tell from photos, but my guess would be either mulberry (the much lighter spot on the stock is very tipycal of it) or chesnut.
Prior to the widespread availability of cocuswood and blackwood, yew and various indigenous fruitwoods were very widely used by pipemakers in Scotland. That's probably the case here (with the stock and drones, anyway...).

upiper71
Posts: 130
Joined: Tue Aug 30, 2005 6:10 am

Post by upiper71 » Mon Aug 13, 2007 6:05 pm

Channing wrote:
Yuri wrote:I'd like to add that from the look of the photos the drones appear to be made of some timber not commonly used in woodwind making. It's of course very difficult to tell from photos, but my guess would be either mulberry (the much lighter spot on the stock is very tipycal of it) or chesnut.
Prior to the widespread availability of cocuswood and blackwood, yew and various indigenous fruitwoods were very widely used by pipemakers in Scotland. That's probably the case here (with the stock and drones, anyway...).
It was in quite a state of disrepair, and will likely stay that way from what I was told by the curator.

Dan Humphries
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Location: Baltimore

Post by Dan Humphries » Mon Aug 20, 2007 10:47 am

Great photos, thanks.

Regarding this shot:

http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sra ... f60c02.jpg

What is the structure obliquely situated next to the thumb hole? Just a filled-in mistake?

upiper71
Posts: 130
Joined: Tue Aug 30, 2005 6:10 am

Post by upiper71 » Tue Aug 21, 2007 12:36 pm

Dan Humphries wrote:Great photos, thanks.

Regarding this shot:

http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sra ... f60c02.jpg

What is the structure obliquely situated next to the thumb hole? Just a filled-in mistake?
Yes, indeed. It appears to be at least just by looking at it. I seen the exact same common stock for the drones last evening in the National Museum of Scotland. Quite interesting.

pastoralpiper
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Real Name: Robert MacDonald
Location: Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
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Re: 18th Century Lowland Pipes discovered..

Post by pastoralpiper » Fri Jun 19, 2009 7:50 pm

Has anyone informed Hugh Cheape of your discovery?

Photostation has gone under - do you still have the images?

I'm a member of the Lowland and Border PIper's Society and a 'serious student' of the Border Pipes. I flatter myself that I can probably deduce as well as anybody on the subject.

I am currently examining/documenting a set of Pastoral pipes in the Regimental Museum of the Seaforth Highlanders of Canada. The drones are almost identical to the ivory Reid set illustrated in Hugh Cheape's recent book. More to follow.

upiper71
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Re: 18th Century Lowland Pipes discovered..

Post by upiper71 » Sun Jun 21, 2009 10:01 am

Mr.Cheape has been notified and I am in regular contact with him somewhat. I've arranged for a 2nd session of picture taking for this particular set, so that he may publish them in his next publication in need be.

Interesting enough, the same drone stock was captured in the NMS in Edinburgh.

Regards,

D

pastoralpiper
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Real Name: Robert MacDonald
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Re: 18th Century Lowland Pipes discovered..

Post by pastoralpiper » Sat Jan 29, 2011 3:39 pm

"Imagestation" has gone quits - would you please post the images on Flicker or Photobucket?

I'm Assistant-Curator of our Regimental Museum (which has several sets of early pipes, including an early Hugh Robertson pastoral set) and am always interested in seeing other early pipes.

The evolutionary process seemed to be 'Border' -> 'Pastoral' -> 'Union' pipes...

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