18th Century Lowland Pipes discovered..

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upiper71
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18th Century Lowland Pipes discovered..

Post by upiper71 » Fri Oct 06, 2006 5:36 am

Hi all,

I just want to show you some pictures of an 18th Century set of Scottish Lowland Pipes..that I discovered about 2 weeks ago in a local museum here. I know their not Uilleann pipes, but you distinctly see the similarities a bit. especially the drones mounted in a common stock.

Last Wednesday, I received permission to view the set in question, and take the appropriate measurements of the chanter,stock,drones, etc. Upon visiting my collegue Richard, had noted the reeds may be of elder, and the chanter reed was not present. See pics below:


http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sra ... a94e71.jpg

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http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sra ... a94e20.jpg

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I know there will be some critics, so, I'll say my peace, these are NOT professional shots! ;)

Regards,

Daryl Mac.[/img]

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dropkick
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Post by dropkick » Fri Oct 06, 2006 5:56 am

Very cool. I wonder what other hidden treasures of the bagpipe variety they may have stashed away.
There are two ends to every pudding... -Cptn. Jack Aubrey.

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PJ
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Post by PJ » Fri Oct 06, 2006 7:00 am

Well done Daryl. Now if you'll excuse me, I'm just going to pry open all the floor boards in my house just in case there's a Harrington or a Kenna stashed away somewhere ... now where did I leave my crowbar...
PJ

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djm
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Post by djm » Fri Oct 06, 2006 7:14 am

Way cool! How well do you know these folks? Would they let you attempt to reed the set? :wink:

djm
Sex and drugs and uilleann pipes

upiper71
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Post by upiper71 » Fri Oct 06, 2006 7:20 am

Well, I don't know them personally.

I visited the exhibition a few years ago with my wife, and just recalled there was a set of antique pipes there. Unfortunately, they won't let many people touch the set as it is in fragile condition. One of the tenor drones, in fact, won't even come out of the stock, without putting about 15-20 lbs pressure on it.

Since both tenors seem to be an exact match, we didn't see the need to try. I have other pictures of the set, just haven't posted them as of yet.

The maker of the chanter comes from ABDN,Scotland (aberdeen) most likely, stamped on the backside chanter but I'm still doing my homework on that one. Interestingly enough, the back-thumb hole seems to have been moved about 1/4" upwards towards the reed-socket, either done by the maker or a tinkerer (if that's even a word).

As far as reeding goes, Im sure I could could find something for a chanter reed but then I would have to give the set a go, but that would be unlikely.

HAPPY THANKSGIVING DAY! for the people in Canada, and remember...NO 2nd helpings..

Regards,

Daryl Mac.


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Post by Gregory Graham » Sun Oct 08, 2006 10:24 am

Thanks for posting those pics Daryl. Fascinating. Interesting to be reminded how closely related Lowland, pastoral, union/uilleann pipes are. One wonders why the Scots have remained so wedded to the uni-octave pipes when it is clear that pastoral and union/uilleann pipes were not some unrelated, distant beast and in fact partially came from their own tradition. I guess it was the Army's use of highland pipes to the exclusion of anything else.

Was the museum the McCord museum in Montreal Daryl?
Gregory Graham
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Post by cj dixon » Sun Oct 08, 2006 12:45 pm

That really is quite neat to see.

Thanks Daryl,
Chris
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upiper71
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Post by upiper71 » Wed Oct 11, 2006 8:44 am

Gregory Graham wrote:Thanks for posting those pics Daryl. Fascinating. Interesting to be reminded how closely related Lowland, pastoral, union/uilleann pipes are. One wonders why the Scots have remained so wedded to the uni-octave pipes when it is clear that pastoral and union/uilleann pipes were not some unrelated, distant beast and in fact partially came from their own tradition. I guess it was the Army's use of highland pipes to the exclusion of anything else.

Was the museum the McCord museum in Montreal Daryl?
There are others but nothing to sing home about. These were probably the oldest set there available and in un-restored condition.

Thanks again to the moderators for letting me post these/! :)

Best regards,

D

upiper71
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post revival

Post by upiper71 » Tue Nov 21, 2006 6:35 am

I found these last additional pictures. However, there is very little known about their owner, I did a little research but the only reference I found was a Father John Massie of Aberdeen,Scotland at that time. It may not be him necessarily, but if anyone on this board has any additional information, the museum curator would be curious to know more for their records, please and thank you.

The donator of this set was a lady who's husband did not return from the front lines in Northern,Italy in WWII. She donated them to his memory in 1943.

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Post by jcullen » Wed Jan 03, 2007 3:12 am

I'm new here...Nice job on the photos. Photographing pipes is a difficult endeavor...they're laid out like a snake...in extreme landscape layout, so it's always hard to get good shots. I have a similar set that I bought in November. I'll get some pictures posted. Hugh Cheape at the National Museum of Scotland had inspected them with the option to purchase the set. He said he thought they were 18th century, but that the NMS did not have the money to buy them, and that they could accept them as a donation. The seller wasn't feeling charitable, so he put them up for sale and that's how I acquired them. They are mounted in horn, and the chanter on mine does not look original, but rather late 19th century. I'm in the process of careful restoration now. The bellows in particular looks like the set you posted, but the drones have many similar features as well.
Cheers!
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upiper71
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Post by upiper71 » Wed Jan 03, 2007 7:50 am

jcullen wrote:I'm new here...Nice job on the photos. Photographing pipes is a difficult endeavor...they're laid out like a snake...in extreme landscape layout, so it's always hard to get good shots. I have a similar set that I bought in November. I'll get some pictures posted. Hugh Cheape at the National Museum of Scotland had inspected them with the option to purchase the set. He said he thought they were 18th century, but that the NMS did not have the money to buy them, and that they could accept them as a donation. The seller wasn't feeling charitable, so he put them up for sale and that's how I acquired them. They are mounted in horn, and the chanter on mine does not look original, but rather late 19th century. I'm in the process of careful restoration now. The bellows in particular looks like the set you posted, but the drones have many similar features as well.
Cheers!
Hey Cullen,

Thanks for your post. These pics are by no means professional, and these pipes in particular are in a sorry state of disrepair and it's quite sad to see them go like that. I had noticed the bag was changed in 2003 as per the curator, by someone I met at the Pipers' Gathering in Vermont.

Good luck with the restoration! 8) I hope everything turns out well for you.

Best regards,

D

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Yuri
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Post by Yuri » Wed Jan 03, 2007 11:56 pm

I'd like to add that from the look of the photos the drones appear to be made of some timber not commonly used in woodwind making. It's of course very difficult to tell from photos, but my guess would be either mulberry (the much lighter spot on the stock is very tipycal of it) or chesnut.

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dropkick
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Post by dropkick » Thu Jan 04, 2007 7:05 am

I've always been very fond of the look that chalice top drones present. Lends an air of antiquity (and in this case the pipes in question are antique :mrgreen: ) more modern sets. Classy.
There are two ends to every pudding... -Cptn. Jack Aubrey.

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http://flojoereeds.com/

upiper71
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Post by upiper71 » Thu Jan 04, 2007 7:49 am

dropkick wrote:I've always been very fond of the look that chalice top drones present. Lends an air of antiquity (and in this case the pipes in question are antique :mrgreen: ) more modern sets. Classy.
Me too.
Last edited by upiper71 on Mon Mar 03, 2008 2:56 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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