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Uilleann Reamer making issues

Posted: Wed Aug 17, 2011 5:28 pm
by univac1107
Hello, im making my first uilleann 'D' reamer, and having this issues i would like to get
your opinions.

1. Trying to turn reamer steps close to the chuck involves constant loosening of the
steel bar from the chuck. No matter how straight you pull, you will induce a small
error at each step, so in the end, you will end up with several milimeters excentricity
at the tip of the reamer.

2. Trying to turn the reamer in an always fixed approach would solve excentricity problems,
but the bar would bend under tool's pressure. you would not use a following rest due to
the taper shape of the reamer.

Thank you very much!

Esteban.

Re: Uilleann Reamer making issues

Posted: Wed Aug 17, 2011 6:13 pm
by John Mulhern
Esteban, the total indicator runout (TIR) mismatch is so small from step to step, that you can discount it as affecting the concentricity of your reamer blank. It's really not necessary to worry about it, unless you already own a collet set up for your lathe, and wish to achieve a tool & cutter grinder level of perfection.

Yes, concentricity would be better if we were able to turn reamer blanks between centers, but obviously, the longer the blank...the more workpiece chatter & "push away" become problems to be reckoned with.

In my opinion, just mark polarity & pull straight out of your 3 jaw chuck (unless you already own a collet set up) when turning your blank. If you measure the steps all around with a depth mic, I think you'll find that TIR is insignificant.
I'm "assuming" that your lathe chuck is in good condition. Try chucking up something which is precision ground & checking the TIR with an indicator. Around .003" is normal for a 3 jaw chuck. If it's much beyond that, then you may have to consider replacing the chuck, or truing up the hard jaws with a tool post I.D. grinder, or installing soft jaws & boring them to fit the diameter of your tool steel. The latter operations need to be done with the chuck jaws clamped under tension.

Re: Uilleann Reamer making issues

Posted: Thu Aug 18, 2011 8:57 am
by univac1107
Thank you very much for your advice.

My lathe is in good condition, but i do not own a collet set.

If you say that little excentricity does not matter, I believe you. I assume the wood pressure over the
reamer will bend it to fit the drilling bore, and wont make an ovality in the bore.

I think a 'D' reamer is more flexible than a 'G' reamer, so it will bend easily to fit the bore.

Thanks!

Esteban.

Re: Uilleann Reamer making issues

Posted: Fri Aug 19, 2011 4:34 am
by Alan
You could try to make 2 or 3 shorter reamers rather than one long one? That'd get you out of a pickle. In many ways...
(Presuming you are making a long reamer?)

Re: Uilleann Reamer making issues

Posted: Fri Aug 19, 2011 4:54 am
by LiamO'Flynn
univac1107 wrote:
I think a 'D' reamer is more flexible than a 'G' reamer, so it will bend easily to fit the bore.

Thanks!

Esteban.
The double faced concave reamer is probably the most flexible.
Liam

Re: Uilleann Reamer making issues

Posted: Fri Aug 19, 2011 8:05 am
by DMQuinn
LiamO'Flynn wrote:The double faced concave reamer is probably the most flexible.
Liam
I remember that this reamer configuration was discussed here some time ago. Can you say more about your experience with it? I'd be very interested to hear how the machining was done.
Thanks.

Re: Uilleann Reamer making issues

Posted: Fri Aug 19, 2011 8:55 am
by univac1107
Alan wrote:You could try to make 2 or 3 shorter reamers rather than one long one? That'd get you out of a pickle. In many ways...
(Presuming you are making a long reamer?)

Yes, I am making just one long reamer.
I had the idea of making several reamers, but in all my research I found nothing about it. So, I assumed
it was not worth the pain. But yes, it would solve a lot of problems.
I will finish this long reamer to see what happens. if its too bad, ill will make 3 partial reamers.

Thanks!

Re: Uilleann Reamer making issues

Posted: Sun Aug 21, 2011 5:14 pm
by LiamO'Flynn
DMQuinn wrote:I remember that this reamer configuration was discussed here some time ago. Can you say more about your experience with it? I'd be very interested to hear how the machining was done.
Thanks.
Necessity may be the mother of invention,but economics is its mother-in-law. I dont have the money to buy expensive machinery so I have to make do with what I have to hand .the reamer grinder is made with a cheap grinder and 3x4 and plywood.
Image
Adjustments to the height are made by turning the hex nuts under the sliding carriage
that holds the reamer.
Image
The reamer is held in place with a screw through the hole in the extra bit on the tang.This hole insures the face are exactly opposite each other. Great care must be taken to go very slowly regarding the depth of each pass .
Image
For what its worth and I know its not much heres an attempt at photo'ing the bore. I have found this type of reamer to cut very well indeed.Some lub helps and again I used what I had to hand which was WD40. A good finished is achived at the end by turning slowly by hand.
Image

Liam

Re: Uilleann Reamer making issues

Posted: Mon Aug 22, 2011 5:31 am
by Hans- Joerg
Thank you, Liam, for the inspiration and the pics! Some further questions: What do you use to propel the grinder? How do you lead the reamer?

Re: Uilleann Reamer making issues

Posted: Tue Aug 23, 2011 7:16 am
by DMQuinn
Thanks very much for sharing those photographs. Looks like a good method.

Re: Uilleann Reamer making issues

Posted: Thu Aug 25, 2011 5:24 am
by LiamO'Flynn
Hans- Joerg wrote:Thank you, Liam, for the inspiration and the pics! Some further questions: What do you use to propel the grinder? How do you lead the reamer?
The grinder is a small electric bench grinder.Its a very low powered model which for safty sake works well ,if you adjust the carriage to much and try to take to much off at a single pass the grinder stops. The carriage is pushed and pulled by hand.The device works well even in its present crude state but it could probably do with a bit more refining.
Once the grinding is finished the reamer is honed with a diamond sharpening plate which also removes any burrs still present
Liam

Re: Uilleann Reamer making issues

Posted: Thu Apr 28, 2016 4:09 am
by strangeconcept
what sort of section/shape did the steel initialy have?

Re: Uilleann Reamer making issues

Posted: Mon May 09, 2016 8:42 pm
by SeamusRua
strangeconcept wrote:what sort of section/shape did the steel initialy have?
As he's making a D reamer, it would have started as a tapered rod, turned on a lathe. Then he grinds off just less than half the material with the pictured grinding set up to create a D cross section, which will make a scraping cut well suited to the dense woods typically used for pipes.

There's lots of old discussions on this forum on the topic of D reamers. Just do a quick search of "D reamer" or just "reamer" and you'll find plenty more information. I believe there was a thread entitled "Regulator reamers" which began by briefly mentioning fluted reamers and then evolved into an extensive discussion on D reamers and various other offshoots.

Re: Uilleann Reamer making issues

Posted: Tue Jun 21, 2016 9:48 am
by LiamO'Flynn
The reamer starts as a steel rod turned into a taper and is then ground on both sides to make a flat reamer ,but very importantly retaining the curve on the sides.

Liam