Take mystery out of pipes continued....Fluted reamer

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patsky
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Take mystery out of pipes continued....Fluted reamer

Post by patsky » Wed Jul 02, 2008 3:43 pm

I had a professional fluted reamer made back in 1975 copying the bore of my Rowsome D chanter. I have made at least 100+ chanters with this reamer. I have never sharpened it and it is still going strong. It is heat treated and will cut steel. It is 17 inches long has four flutes with a long left hand twist to prevent the stock from grabbing the reamer.

A tip: it is better to bevel the edge of the reamer so that it scrapes instead of cutting. A sharp cutting reamer has a tendency to dig in and chatter.

I use soap water as a lubricant.

I do not use tuning reamers but undercut the tone holes to bring them in.


All the best,
Pat Sky

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David Stephenson
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Post by David Stephenson » Fri Jul 04, 2008 12:23 pm

Please could you tell us if your fluted reamer has all the parameters built into it, or do you use multiple reamers to set the cone.

I have several flute/twisted reamers in both directions, which do not grab as much as the straight type, but you have to be careful not to burst the timber, because they tend to wind themselves inwards.

The cutting adges of a flat reamer act just like a scraper, the cutting edges are equaleteral and the trailing edge burnishes the top of the cut before it, the reamer can be used in reverse to polish off the tiny fibres left behind even further.

Davy.
Train to be a pipe maker today, help those who want to help themselves.

patsky
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RE: Reamers

Post by patsky » Fri Jul 04, 2008 1:31 pm

Dear Davy,
When I had my reamer made I took my chanter to an engineering company for measurements. The reamer is also hardened and tempered.

The left hand twist of the reamer tends to push the reamer out of the bore, thus making a very smooth cut. I use several drills to step drill the chanter first and then use the reamer to create the bore or cone.

One point about using a single reamer is that a reamer cuts only its highest points. So that a single reamer needs to be as straight as possible.

If the bore varies than you must use the straight reamer then tuning reamers or undercuts, to create the variations.

One last thing. When I start reaming a chanter I complete the bore in one setting. I have also taken into consideration the shrinkage of the wood so that I over ream the chanter, then as it cools it shrinks to the proper dimensions. I do not support the idea of boring a chanter then laying it aside for weeks, to re-bore later on. If the chanter is bored and left even a few hours it will warp and the straight reamer will then gouge out the warp creating an elliptical bore.

All the best,
Pat Sky

ttoberer
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Post by ttoberer » Sat Jul 05, 2008 10:57 pm

I noticed some adjustable reamers in a catalog the other day. not sure if they would be of any use to a pipemaker, the sizes would be more useful to a flutemaker, but they sure looked interesting. it seems the technology could be used to make the ultimate pipemakers reamers that would adjust to different tapers as you needed. the blades may also be replaceable, wouldnt that be nice!

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David Stephenson
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Re: RE: Reamers

Post by David Stephenson » Sun Jul 06, 2008 8:04 am

patsky wrote:Dear Davy,
When I had my reamer made I took my chanter to an engineering company for measurements. The reamer is also hardened and tempered.

The left hand twist of the reamer tends to push the reamer out of the bore, thus making a very smooth cut. I use several drills to step drill the chanter first and then use the reamer to create the bore or cone.

One point about using a single reamer is that a reamer cuts only its highest points. So that a single reamer needs to be as straight as possible.

If the bore varies than you must use the straight reamer then tuning reamers or undercuts, to create the variations.

One last thing. When I start reaming a chanter I complete the bore in one setting. I have also taken into consideration the shrinkage of the wood so that I over ream the chanter, then as it cools it shrinks to the proper dimensions. I do not support the idea of boring a chanter then laying it aside for weeks, to re-bore later on. If the chanter is bored and left even a few hours it will warp and the straight reamer will then gouge out the warp creating an elliptical bore.

All the best,
Pat Sky
It is possible to get a working instrument by using a straight cone, but it is not so user freindly if you have to tune certain notes along it, for this reason it is best to have a multiple, say three or four different angles to play with, then you can manipulate just about any part of the bore you choose, and produce a paticular sounding instrument.

If you use well seasoned timber, my Holly has been sitting for at least 8 years with the pilot hole drilled in it, and use plenty of lube whilst you are reaming, it should prevent any heat build up, and shouldn't need any shrinkage allottment, but it is wise to let the chanter settle for at least a week and give the bore a final wipe out then do the final settings again before finishing the instrument.

The lube also impregnates the inner wall surface and seals it, and also bunishes it to a nice shine.

Davy.
Train to be a pipe maker today, help those who want to help themselves.

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snoogie
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Re: RE: Reamers

Post by snoogie » Sun Jul 06, 2008 10:48 am

David Stephenson wrote:
The lube also impregnates the inner wall surface and seals it, and also bunishes it to a nice shine.

Davy.
What do you use for your bore lube?
There is no try, only do or not do - Yoda

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David Stephenson
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Re: RE: Reamers

Post by David Stephenson » Sun Jul 06, 2008 11:00 am

[quote="snoogie
What do you use for your bore lube?[/quote]

Its a mixture of beeswax and linseed oil, 500cc oil X 1 ouce of wax.

You can also use Danish or Tung oil to seal the bore too, after you have reamed the bore or cone, fill up the bore with the oil and leave it to soak in for a few hours, this works very well on fruit woods.

Or mix your own concoction from anything you have to hand, but not motor or engine oil, it must be a natural, one that will dry.

Davy.
Train to be a pipe maker today, help those who want to help themselves.

ttoberer
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Post by ttoberer » Mon Jul 07, 2008 12:04 pm

pat, what sort of drills are you using to step bore? and do you go from big to small or the other way? ive tried several ways and havnt settled on any particular method. davies method of using successive reamers instead of step boring sounds interesting. I have one homemade step drill from flat stock that roughs out a chanter pretty nicely, but it took a while to make. also do you use the same reamer for the tenor and bari regs? a hardened and ground profesionally made reamer would be nice, but these days, I wonder how much it would cost to have one made? they are still a good option for anyone not wanting to mess with a metal lathe. I am also curious if you have ever compared the dimensions of your own chanter to other rowesomes? to continue my barrage of questions, are the dimensions you give in your book accurate to the dimensions of your own chanters patterned after the rowesome? Tim

patsky
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RE: Step drills

Post by patsky » Mon Jul 07, 2008 3:39 pm

ttoberer,
I have 2 gun drills ... a 3/16" and a 1/4" and 7 step drills that a are simply twist drills welded on to a rod.

First I true up my wood cylinder than I take the 1/4" drill and run it in all the way. Then I have a 1/4" rod with a small 3/16" diameter X 1/4" long drill on the end, I run this in and this set a small starter hole up inside the bore to give a true start to the 3/16" gun drill. Once this pilot hole is all the way through I then start inserting the step drills, from the largest to the smallest, to remove most of the rough ( note all of the drills have a mark on them to let me know how far to run them into the bore before reaming); Oh yes... once I have finished drilling I then bore the tone holes finishing with my reamer. The drilling, start to finish, takes around 40 minutes. Finally I then turn the chanter/regulator on the lathe.

Incidentally Leo Rowsome, Dan Dowd and Matt Kiernan all bored the tone holes BEFORE they reamed and turned the chanter. I am sure that there are other methods. But this one works for me.

Pat

patsky
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Stuff

Post by patsky » Mon Jul 07, 2008 4:09 pm

Tim,

I forgot to answer a couple of questions.:

My Rowsome is a medium bore. Rowsome made several differant kinds of chanters. David Quinn's CD has the wide bore deminsions.

The measurements in my Book are for the original Rowsome measurements taken from my Rowsome set. My own chanter is Longer and wider to bring it to concert. The Rowsome chanters are usually on the sharp side.

A good reamer today is in the $ 500-700 range.

Pat

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