Question about regulators

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cheip
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Question about regulators

Post by cheip » Wed Apr 03, 2019 5:06 am

Why regulators are called *regulators*? What they regulates?

outofthebox8
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Re: Question about regulators

Post by outofthebox8 » Thu Apr 04, 2019 4:57 am

Good question! In my opinion the word 'regulator' refers to the regulation of tempo - in that the keys are tapped with the wrist in accordance with the tempo of the tune being played. I agree that it is a strange choice of word, which leads me back to my other theory - that the Irish pipes may have been developed by instrument makers who came over from France and that the word 'regulator' may be a derivation or translation of some French musical term.

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rgouette
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Re: Question about regulators

Post by rgouette » Fri Apr 26, 2019 2:28 pm

some bits...
The regulators, of which the modem full set possesses three, are in effect closed chanters. The term regulator was evidently borrowed from engineering where it denoted a device used to regulate the passage of air. The two small regulators, the tenor and baritone, are fitted directly into the common stock alongside the drones. The bass regulator is attached to the side of the stock by means of the bass bar through which the air from the bag is supplied to it . The ends of the regulators are stopped by caps of ivory or other material through which the tuning pin, a small piece of brass wire, passes into the bore. Rushes, stripped to expose the pith, arc tied to the pin and by moving these in and out and by adjusting their length, some refinement of tuning can be achieved. Some sets possessed a fourth and even more regulators but these were intended for use in church as a substitute for the more expensive organ and only the regulators were intended to be played. It seems that the first regulator was added to the pipes around 1790. Edward Ledwich, in his Antiquities of Ireland published in that year, informs us that:-the instrument under the hands of a master, is rendered worthy of being esteemed a musical instrument. Especially in those instruments in which a second Chanter is inserted, denominated a regulator ... but this lan improve-ment is not at present universal, few being acquainted with it.
onthis very subject. I think it is worth reporting here, assuming that many readershave not previously seen this.The earliest description of the Irish bellows blown bagpipe seems to be JohnOKeefe (1747- 1833). These he saw in 1774 when OKeefe - a Dublin actorand dramatist - first saw McDonnell on stage. McDonnell was apparently afamous piper and lived in great style.The term regulator was first mentioned by William Beauford in a description ofthe pipes written in 1789. In an earlier description of 1785 he did not mentiona regulator.The term organ pipes was used (1774) before the regulator was added.The term union pipes first appears in 1794.A

outofthebox8
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Re: Question about regulators

Post by outofthebox8 » Sat Apr 27, 2019 3:47 am

'The term regulator was evidently borrowed from engineering where it denoted a device used to regulate the passage of air.'

I would like to see the evidence for that. The word 'regulator' certainly did become established as an engineering term - especially associated with the development of steam engines (the regulator valve). But I reckon that would have been in a later period - the early pipemakers would have developed their first 'regulators' before the engineering term came into play and gained wider currency.

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